A fair warning to budding web developers.

Imagine that you are in kindergarten again, and it coloring time. Look around at your friends; all have boxes full of colors. You however have one of those 3-packs you get at a restaurant, one of them is broken, another is white, and the meal cost $650. Teacher then instructs you to draw a rainbow….

… That, my friends, was my experience with Lasso

If you’re a professional programmer, then chances are you’ve never heard of Lasso. This is a good thing. Lasso is a very expensive way for people with no programming experience, to put together simple web applications. That is, of course, instead of paying a professional half the price to do it right.

Lasso uses a tag-based language. It has no classes, no functions, no way to organize your code… except with include files… lots and lots of include files. It comes in two flavors: Bracket Syntax, which serves to make your code look more like the creative brick wall that it is; and LassoScript, which despite looking more like a modern language, is touted to be the “less-sophisticated” of the two styles… go figure.

To give you a better understanding of the nature of the beast, I submit a little demonstration I call C# vs. Lasso:

// Simple C# Example
string strOutput = "This is C#.Net";
for( i=1; i< =5; i++ ){
    Response.Write("Line "+i+" : "+strOutput);
    //intCtr++; Bad Line Commented out
}


[Output_None]Simpe Lasso Example[/Output_None]
[Var:'Text_To_Display_Var'='This is Lasso']
[Loop:5]
    ['Line '+(Loop_Count)+' : '+($Text_To_Display)]
    [Output_None]
        [NoProcess]
            [$Item_Counter_Var=Item_Counter_Var+1]
        [/NoProcess]
    [/Output_None]
[/Loop]

Be forewarned young programmers, Lasso is out there. I battled it for over seven months and barely made it out with my .Net library in tact.

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